Inner Sea Gods – A Pathfinder RPG Review

Mid-August Review Week continues with my review of Inner Sea Gods (Paizo, May 2014).

How’s your faith these days?

The bulk of Inner Sea Gods, appropriately enough, concerns itself with these deities. It’s mostly a fluff book – there’s not much in the way of game mechanics in the first 2/3 of the book to concern yourself with.

Assuming you’re running a campaign set in Golarion, Inner Sea Gods is pretty damn useful – the religions of Golarion are a central part of the campaign setting, for good or for ill (and a substantial number of them ARE for ill – demon cults, diabolic lords, and gods of corruption). Chapters 3 and 4, composing roughly 1/3 of the book put together, are ways to use the information in chapters 1 and 2 in the game, including magic items, feats, traits, and other helpful pieces of rules.

Physical Construction Notes

Not much to say on the physical construction front. Solid hardcover like most of Paizo’s big ones. Pathfinder Campaign Setting logo is, of course, given pride of place. The logo has changed rather substantially since the release of Inner Sea World Guide, having gotten a new color and a new outline that give it a nice subtle separation from the rest of the Pathfinder line.

Playability

The majority of Inner Sea Gods is “fluff” – roleplaying information, rather than game mechanics (“crunch”). It’s good fluff with some pretty useful character seeds embedded in it, but if you don’t use Pathfinder to play in Golarion, its default setting, you probably won’t get nearly as much out of this book as someone who does.

The other third of the book, however, contains mechanics that you can use and adapt to any other campaign setting. Fluff adjustments to these mechanics will of course be needed because they’re themed to the deities of Pathfinder, but that’s ok.

Summary

Inner Sea Gods is definitely worth the purchase if you’re running in Golarion. If you’re not, and you’re not willing to put the $40 cover price to a book that you’re only going to use a third of, give it a miss.

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